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Serving South Florida

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For over 30 years

Down Sizing Tips

Lots of people these days are following that motto and trying to live a life of less; less junk, less clutter, less stress and less house. So how do you downsize your world when you’ve spent your life accumulating stuff?   Planning your space before you downsize is essential; downsizing requires some careful thought!

Whether you are a baby-boomer having to move your parents or a family who wants to downsize from the stress of a large home, to people wanting to plan a second home on a small scale, or even for people just wanting to have less to manage in their current home. Empty nesters and not-so-empty-nesters alike will find tried and true principles to get them through the challenges. Downsizing doesn’t have to mean losing your style either. In fact, when you do this right, you can end up with even more style with less stuff.

If downsizing is in the foreseeable future for you or a parent, here are seven ways to pare down the possessions. If downsizing seems daunting, remember this: if the home will be placed on the market, you’ll likely have to cut clutter nonetheless.

Plan backwards from moving day. If you have a clear idea when you (or a parent) are planning to move, start downsizing three months prior. It sounds taxing, but tackling every room (and/or garage, basement or attic) in one fell swoop is more challenging, if not impossible – especially for homeowners who’ve stayed put for years. Sorting through one room at a time is best.

Write a list of all the items you love and can’t live without; it will help you bid adieu to things that didn’t make the list. It’s hard to persuade people they can’t take everything with them, but by keeping what’s on your wish list, you won’t be upset about the things you can’t keep.

Stick to the OHIO rule. “Only handle it once.” Avoid placing items in “maybe” piles, particularly when helping a parent who may have a difficult time letting go. Ask yourself or your parent if they would replace the item if it disappeared – this will make the process feel much less like a trashing of beloved possessions.

Remember more isn’t always better. We all have items we’re saving “just in case” the original breaks. Don’t be afraid to purge duplicates. The same applies to clothing – avoid holding on to garments that no longer fit, but might “one day.”

Get a feel for the size of your new rooms by comparing them to rooms of similar dimensions in your present home. For instance, your living-room-to-be might be roughly the same size as your current bedroom. You may think you can squeeze in two sofas, but this kind of reality check could help you realize that only one will fit comfortably.

Get cash for your castoffs. Remember the three-month rule? If you’re planning to sell an item, start early – some things may not move as quickly as you’d like, and you don’t want to be stuck with items you no longer want come moving day. Keep in mind that eBay charges a selling fee, and items like shoes or books tend to languish on Craigslist.

Contact an auction house. If you or your parent has an assortment of valuable items, like antique furniture or artwork, coin and stamp collections, et. al. consider enlisting an auction house rather than an antique dealer – dealers want the most bang for their buck, not yours. Compile a large lot so the appraiser can assess items in one visit. An estate sales group can help facilitate the sale or auction of high-end belongings, too.

Donate as much as you can. Donating items to charitable organizations can make parting with possessions much more manageable. In many areas, the Salvation Army is available to transport big-ticket items like furniture or appliances. Other house wares in good condition can be donated to Goodwill or a local charity.